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Spy?

TORA TORA TORA is a re-creation of the December 7th 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. It's accomplished through hundreds of dedicated volunteers, most belonging to the Commemorative Air Force (CAF) working as ground crew, maintenance, pilots and pyrotechnic experts. The purpose is to create a dynamic history lesson about the event that propelled us into World War II .....and entertain. TORA's re-creation is usually the feature performance at organized air shows. It involves many Japanese fighters and bombers simulating the Pearl Harbor attack.

Hungry

P-40 & P-51
The Texas Flying Legends Museum is here to remind our younger generations of the virtue, strength, pride and valor that each member of our armed forces carried with them during a period of time when our country needed them most. We hope that these pristine warbirds can provide a sense of inspiration for those who have not experienced war first-hand, and most importantly honor all Veterans and their loved ones, while inspiring the next generation.
B-25 & P-40
Advenger & Wildcat
B-25 & Advenger
Spitfire & Wildcat
Spitfire & Wildcat
P-40 & P-51
"Fat Albert" is a nickname given to the plane by Marine Corps Blue Angel pilots in the 1970s because of its size and shape. It is a reference to the popular children's cartoon of the same era.
The mission of the United States Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron is to showcase the pride and professionalism of the United States Navy and Marine Corps by inspiring a culture of excellence and service to country through flight demonstrations and community outreach.
The Blue Angel F/A-18s have the nose cannon removed, a smoke-oil tank installed and a spring installed on the stick which applies pressure for better formation and inverted flying. Otherwise, the aircraft that the squadron flies are the same as those in the fleet. Each Blue Angel aircraft is capable of being returned to combat duty aboard an aircraft carrier within 72 hours.
The smoke is produced by pumping biodegradable, paraffin-based oil directly into the exhaust nozzles of the aircraft, where the oil is instantly vaporized into smoke. The smoke provides a traceable path for spectators to follow, so they can see the flight profile that has been flown. It also enhances safety of flight by providing a valuable means by which the solo pilots can see each other during opposing maneuvers and conditions of lowered visibility or haze. The smoke poses no hazard to the environment.
A total of 16 officers voluntarily serve with the Blue Angels. Each year the team typically selects three tactical (fighter or fighter/attack) jet pilots, two support officers and one Marine Corps C-130 pilot to relieve departing members. The Chief of Naval Air Training selects the "Boss," the Blue Angels Commanding Officer. Boss must have at least 3,000 tactical jet flight-hours and have commanded a tactical jet squadron. The Commanding Officer flies the Number 1 jet.
The Chief of Naval Air Training also selects the "XO," the Blue Angels Executive Officer. XO is a s a Naval Flight Officer (NFO) and must have at least 1,250 tactical jet flight-hours.

Career-oriented Navy and Marine Corps jet pilots with an aircraft carrier qualification and a minimum of 1,250 tactical jet flight-hours are eligible for positions flying jets Number 2 through 7. The Events Coordinator, Number 8, is a Naval Flight Officer (NFO) or a Weapons Systems Officer (WSO) who meets the same criteria as Numbers 2 through 7. The Marine Corps pilots flying the C-130T Hercules aircraft, affectionately known as "Fat Albert," must be aircraft commander qualified with at least 1,200 flight hours.

Career-oriented officers specializing in maintenance, administration, aviation medicine, public affairs and supply fill support positions. The Blue Angels base their selection of officers on professional ability, military bearing and communication skills. Blue Angels officers are well-rounded representatives of their fleet counterparts.

Officers typically serve two years with the team. Blue Angels officers return to the fleet after their tours of duty.

The mission of the Blue Angels is to showcase the pride and professionalism of the United States Navy and Marine Corps by inspiring a culture of excellence and service to country through flight demonstrations and community outreach.

In 2016, the Blue Angels will celebrate their 70th anniversary. Since 1946, the Blue Angels have performed for more than 484 million fans.

Stereo photo

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Special thanks must go to Karen Strong

Please remember that all photo's are copyright SkyFlash/UGA, they are for private use only.

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